Cocaine

Cocaine

First Royal stimulant; then medical marvel; finally modern menace  


Cocaine! Is that the notorious drug we know of?

Cocaine is the world’s most powerful and oldest known natural stimulant. It is one of the most commonly used (and abused) plant-derived drugs in the world that is used nasally, injected, or smoked for mind-altering effects.There are two chemical forms of cocaine that are abused: the water-soluble hydrochloride salt and the water-insoluble cocaine base (or freebase).

Cocaine is generally sold on the street as a fine, white, crystalline powder and is also known as “coke,” “C,” “snow,” “flake,” or “blow.” Street dealers generally dilute it with inert substances such as cornstarch, talcum powder, or sugar, or with active drugs such as procaine (a chemically related local anesthetic) or amphetamine (another stimulant). Some users combine cocaine with heroin—in what is termed a “speedball.” 


Where does cocaine come from?

 

Coca cultivation in South American countries

Coca leaves are the only source of cocaine. Today the sources of all cultivated coca are two closely related South American shrub species Erythroxylum coca and Erythroxylumnovogranatense (Plowman, 1984) adapted to environmentally distinct regions in Colombia, Bolivia, Peru (Ehleringer, 2000) and, most recently Brazil (Duffy, 2008). The alkaloid content of coca leaves is low, between 0.25% and 0.77% (Plowman 1983) and concentrations of cocaine ranges from 0.00008 to 0.00882% (Aynilian et al. 1974). 

The coca leaf has been chewed and brewed for tea traditionally for centuries among its indigenous peoples in the Andean region and does not cause any harm and is beneficial to human health. The traditional method of chewing coca leaf, called acullico, consists of keeping a saliva-soaked ball of coca leaves in the mouth together with an alkaline substance that assists in extracting cocaine from the leaves.When chewed, coca acts as a mild stimulant and suppresses hunger, thirst, pain, and fatigue. It helps overcome altitude sickness. Coca chewing and drinking of coca tea is carried out daily by millions of people in the Andes without problems, and is considered sacred within indigenous cultures. Coca tea is widely used, even outside the Andean Amazon region. Coca has an established use spread among all social classes, in two Northern provinces of Argentina. There is an increasing use of coca flour as a food supplement.

While the coca leaf in its natural form is a harmless and mild stimulant comparable to coffee, there is no doubt that cocaine can be extracted from the coca leaf. Without coca there would be no cocaine. The ‘ready extractability’ of cocaine from coca leaves is currently the major argument to justify the current illegal status of the leaf in the 1961 UN Convention.

Coca is traditionally cultivated in the lower altitudes of the eastern slopes of the Andes, or the highlands depending on the species grown, in particular in Bolivia, Colombia and Peru. However, coca is a relatively easy plant to grow. In the late 19th century, colonial powers replanted coca outside its natural habitat. There was significant coca cultivation on the island of Java (at the time part of the Dutch East-Indies, currently Indonesia) and Ceylon (Sri Lanka), as well as Formosa (at the time a Japanese protectorate, currently Taiwan). In the 1920s Java was the major producer of coca in the world.

Cocaine, was isolated about 1860 and was synthesized to be used in manufacturing popular patent medicines, beverages and "tonics" until the early years of the 20th century. Concern about cocaine use began in many countries in the 1910s and 1920s, centered on dependence on the drug and subsequent "moral ruin", particularly among the young. Laws restricting the availability of cocaine saw a drop in consumption in most of the countries surveyed from the 1920s until the 1960s.

In 1961 the coca leaf was listed on Schedule I of the UN Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs together with cocaine and heroin, with a strict control level on medical and scientific use. The inclusion of coca leaf in Schedule I was done with a dual purpose: to phase out coca chewing and to prevent the manufacture of cocaine. The Single Convention mandated to destroy coca bush if illegally cultivated (Article 26) and that coca leaf chewing must be abolished within a 25-year period (Article 49) - i.e. by December 1989, 25 years after the coming into force of the treaty. 

The main strategy to curb cocaine use is to decrease demand at home and supply from abroad. Since the 1980s aggressive strategies have been applied to eradicate coca cultivation in the Andean region mainly instigated by the United States.In Peru and Bolivia manual forced eradication has led to clashes between coca-producers (cocaleros) and military, resulting in deaths and human right violations. Colombia is the country where forced eradication of illicit cultivation of coca is executed in the most aggressive way by aerial spraying with herbicides (fumigation).Another strategy is to provide coca-growing peasant with alternative development projects, substituting coca with other viable crops.


Coca cultivation in Asian countries

Pure cocaine was originally extracted from the leaf of the Erythroxylum coca, which grew primarily in Peru and Bolivia. Exports first of leaves and then of processed cocaine started in the latter half of the 19th century. Of course in those days, it was not illegal (coca was an important legal crop until WWII); the best known product to use cocaine was Coca-Cola, which was strongly promoted as being alcohol-free. Needless to say, Coca-Cola no longer contains even a hint of cocaine after United States passed the Pure Food and Drug act in 1906. The major coca cultivation, cocaine production and exportation sites, from the late 19th to the mid-20th century were Peru, Bolivia and Java; and Formosa from the late 19th through the early 20th century.Asian plantations were later stopped because cocaine and other narcotic drugs became controlled substances after the Geneva Convention of 1925. The Dutch established coca plantations throughout Java and Sumatrain mid 1880s. The English also established coca plantations in Ceylon and India in late 1880s. In India, it was observed that the best results were obtained from plants grown on the uplands of the Nilgiri hills (Chopra 1958).Coca leaves were grown on commercial scale in Ceylon and exported only to British manufecturersuntil the Great War broke out.Bolivian coca was known as Huanuco, Peruvian coca as Truxillo, Ceylon coca as Ceylon Huanuco, and Javanese coca as Java coca. During 1920s Java was the world's foremost exporter of coca leaves and majority of the leaves were shipped to Amsterdam. Representatives of German and Japanese drug houses purchased all coca leaves that was not shipped to Amsterdam.Later the Japanese established their own plantation in Taiwan and Iwo Jima around 1910s. At that time it was the second most important drug after quinine. In 1930 Japan was the largest cultivar of coca crop through its satellite states but production rapidly fell during the rest of the decade.  

The problems of addiction, violence and rising crime were apparent, and this, combined with the widespread belief that cocaine incited African-Americans to commit rape and murder, led in part to the 1914 Harisson tax act, which required cocaine and opioids to be dispensed only with a doctor's order.


Application of cocaine in beverages and pharmaceuticals

Cocaine production for therapeutic purposes in early 20th century 

Establishing the manufacture of crude cocaine at plants close to the source of the supply of coca leaves proved to be the most significant development in the production of cocaine. Although coca leaves were duty free, crude cocaine was commercially attractive because transportation of fresh coca leaves to distant markets was problematic. Two types of product, crystallizable (cocaine) and noncrystallizable (cocaine like), could be produced in those days that limited the production of cocaine. Since 1885 there were several local Peruvian companies offering crude cocaine. The first European company to establish crude cocaine production was Boehringer&Soehne of Mannheim; which opened a factory in Lima in 1885. Another German company Farbwerke devised a patented processin 1898 to convert all of the alkaloid in coca leaf into usable cocaine.Knowledge from the German patent and the availability of relatively cheap coca leaf from Java led in 1900 to the establishment of the NederlandscheCocaïnefabriek in Amsterdam, which became the largest manufacturer of cocaine in 1910 (Bosman 2012). Other notable Dutch manufacturers were Cheiron in Bussum and Brocades &SteehmaninMeppel.Several Japanese pharmaceutical companies were involved in both coca plantation and cocaine manufacturing until WWII, most notably Hoshi pharmaceuticals, Takeda pharmaceuticals, Koto pharmaceuticals, Shionogi pharmaceuticals, and Sankyo pharmaceuticals.  


Originally intended as a patent medicine when it was invented in 1886 by John Pemberton. He used five ounces of coca leaf (141.7 g) per gallon of syrup in the first five years, but the comapny was bought by businessman Asa Griggs Candler in 1891, who claimed his formula contained only 0.5 ounces. (14.2 g)

Over the next twelve years, Coca-Cola contained an estimated 9 milligrams of cocaine per glass. After 1904, the company started using leftovers of the cocaine-extraction process, instead of fresh leaves.

The ethanol in the wine extracted the cocaine from the coca leave, altering the drink’s effect. The Vin Mariani contained 6 mg of cocaine per fluid ounce, (0.028 l) but the exported drink contained 7.2 mg per ounce to compete with the similar drinks in the United States.

Some famous people and royalties liked the Mariani wine, Queen Victoria, Pope Leo XIII, Pope Saint Pius X, Jules Verne, Alexandre Dumas, Emile Zola, Thomas Edison and Ulysses S. Grant, among others.

 

What cocaine actually is?

 

Chemical structure of cocaine 

Cocaine is a naturally occurring tropane alkaloid produced by some shrubs of Erythroxylum genus. It is a secondary metabolite of these shrubs and a complex ester of ecgonine, benzoic acid and methanol. 


Do we have any medical application of cocaine?

In 1884 it was discovered that cocaine was an anaesthetic particularly suited for eye surgery. Involuntary movements of the eye could be stopped, so doctors could operate. In the beginning it was also used as an anaesthetic in dentistry. Today, medical use of cocaine is confined primarily to nose and throat surgery.


Cocaine was the first local anesthetic for regional anesthesia. Regional anesthesia involves numbing only part of the body by injecting local anesthetics into or near nerves, where they interrupt the transmission of pain signals to the brain.

In 1859, a German chemist, Albert Niemann (1834-1861) extracted the active substance from coca leaves and named it cocaine. However, it wasn't until 1884 that it became widely known as a local anesthetic. In that year Dr. Karl Koller (1857-1944), a German ophthalmologist, announced his successful use of cocaine as a topical anesthetic for eye surgery. In Europe and the United States there was an immediate surge of experimentation with cocaine, leading to revolutionary developments in regional anesthesia as well as new surgical procedures.


How come cocaine became a notorious drug?

Cocaine is not a new drug. In fact, it is one of the oldest known psychoactive substances. Coca leaves, the source of cocaine, have been chewed and ingested for thousands of years, and the purified chemical, cocaine hydrochloride, has been an abused substance for more than 100 years. In the early 1900s, for example, purified cocaine was the main active ingredient in most of the tonics and elixirs that were developed to treat a wide variety of illnesses.


Cocaine is another name for money!

The coca leaf operates in farming communities almost as currency for the exchange of products (barter system).  It is marketed to obtain currency and be able to respond to new urban consumer demands. (13)

Coca plays a key role in reciprocating manners.  In the Andean culture all social interaction is conceived in terms of reciprocation or interchange.  There is no reciprocal interchange in which coca is not offered, for instance: If a man or woman asks for ayni (an Aymar a custom of reciprocal help), he/she will offer a handful of coca.  A man would show his acceptance of the charge receiving the coca from the offeror.  Petitions submitted to community leaders may be accompanied with coca and alcohol.  Similarly, the coca, it is very important when a leader assumes a community position, or when those who lead a group of native dancers are named.  The petition of a woman in marriage is led by the relatives of the groom by offering a handful of coca.  The success of the petition would be indicated by the acceptance or rejection of the gift.

To organize more complex tasks, such as feasts, construction or even battle against the enemy, groups or the entire community will gather the whole night.  There, coca is distributed and is chewed during the meeting.  Its use is extended in special occasions such as festivities both in the country and the suburban areas. In the Bolivian Yungas, an area which produced coca since the Incas, the coca field accompanies the vital cycle of the family. 

   When a couple is joined in matrimony they have to build a house and plant a coca field.  The planting is born with the family, grows and thrives with it.  When their children grow and bring a wife to help with the chores, the coca field and the home will have reached the pinnacle of production and their modest wealth. In time, their offspring will leave home, their parents will grow old alone, like their coca field which yields little, but enough for the reduced family.

Thus coca is key to enter into social relationships in Andean cultures; it promotes trust and is like a visiting card. Sergio Quijada explains this very aptly when he asserts:

Coca, when chewed in small quantities (chakcharoracullico), is an efficient bond and link to knit the fabric of fraternization and amiability among fellow countrymen.”

Socially, coca is offered and handed out to extend and strengthen the kinship and reciprocation relationship, so dearly needed in the Andean world to achieve labor, prestige, power and social integration. (14)


Cocaine consumption in ancient civilizations…

Cocaine in South American mummies 

· Scientists from the Department of Forensic Medicine at the University of Copenhagen have examined the bodies of three 500-year-old Inca children along with scientists from Bradford University in England in 2013 and confirmed that the subjects were drugged with cocaine and alcohol before sacrifice. 

· In 1993 Springfield et al. found cocaine and its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and methylecgonine, in hair samples from ancient Peruvian coca-leaf chewers dating back to AD 1000. The two metabolites were found in higher concentration than the parent drug. The metabolite levels appeared to be below that of modern cocaine abusers and gender did not appear to be a factor in the incorporation of drug into hair.

In 1991 Cartwell et al., detected cocaine metabolites in pre-Columbian mummy hair from South America using a radio immunoassay method.   In this study two out of eight mummies analyzed showed cocaine metabolites. The two mummies testing positive were from the Camarones Valley in northern Chile.

Cocaine in Egyptian mummies

Dr.SvetlaBalabanova and two of her colleagues reported findings of cocaine, hashish and nicotine in Egyptian mummies in 1992.  The findings were immediately identified as improbable on the grounds that two of the substances were known to be derived only from American plants; cocaine from Erythroxylum coca, and nicotine from Nicotianatabacum; defending the fact that no one could possibly set foot on Americas before Columbus. Since the initial work of Balabanova et al., other studies have revealed the presence of same drugs in Egyptian mummies, confirming the original results.   Nerlichet al. found the compounds in several of the mummy's organs in1995 during a study evaluating the tissue pathology of an Egyptian mummy dating from approximately 950 BC.   They found the highest amounts of nicotine and cocaine in the mummy's stomach, and the hashish traces primarily in the lungs.   These findings were identified using both radio immunoassay and GC-MS techniques.



Comments